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Antwerp@C investigates potential for halving CO2 emissions in Port of Antwerp by 2030

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Antwerp@C investigates potential for halving CO2 emissions in Port of Antwerp by 2030. Image: Port of Antwerp
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Port of Antwerp brought seven leading chemical and energy companies together at the end of 2019 to reduce CO2 emissions and take practical steps in the transition to a sustainable, low-carbon port. The consortium consists of Air Liquide, BASF, Borealis, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Fluxys, Port of Antwerp and Total.

With the project entitled Antwerp@C the partners aim to keep CO2 out of the atmosphere and so to make a significant contribution towards the climate objectives, thanks to applications for capturing and utilising or storing CO2, all within a relatively short time span and at reasonable costs. The project has the potential to reduce the CO2 emissions within the port (18.65 million tonnes greenhouse gas emissions in 2017) by half between now and 2030. This week Fluxys, Port of Antwerp, Total and Air Liquide submitted EU subsidy applications for taking the project one step further.

Port of Antwerp, the carbon capture pioneer

Port of Antwerp is home to the largest integrated energy and chemicals cluster in Europe. This makes it the ideal location to set up new, cross-border collaboration projects for innovative CO2 reduction. To this end, Air Liquide, BASF, Borealis, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Fluxys, Port of Antwerp and Total joined forces at the end of 2019 under the name of Antwerp@C, to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of building CO2 infrastructure to support future CCUS (Carbon Capture Utilisation & Storage) applications. Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) and eventually also Carbon Capture & Utilisation (CCU) – i.e. reusing CO2 as a raw material for the chemical industry – are seen as important routes in the transition to a carbon-neutral port.

Antwerp@C investigates potential for halving CO2 emissions in Port of Antwerp by 2030

Antwerp@C investigates potential for halving CO2 emissions in Port of Antwerp by 2030. Image: Port of AntwerpFeasibility study

Antwerp@C is currently carrying out a feasibility study with the support of the Flemish Agency for Innovation & Enterprise (Vlaams Agentschap Innoveren & Ondernemen, or VLAIO). This will investigate the possibility of building a central “backbone” in the form of a pipeline along the industrial zones on both the Right and Left banks of the Scheldt, along with various shared processing units, a shared CO2 liquefaction unit, interim storage facilities and cross-border transport of CO2, both by ship and by pipeline.

Cross-border transport infrastructure

Since Belgium does not have suitable geological strata, international collaboration will be necessary to transport the CO2 across borders and store it permanently in e.g. depleted offshore gas fields. For this purpose Antwerp@C is investigating the possibilities of transport to Rotterdam by pipeline or by ship to Norway.

Subsidies are essential

Broad support – especially financial support – by the EU, the Belgian Federal Government and the Flemish Government will be essential to ensure the success of the project. Antwerp@C is pursuing two initiatives for cross-border CO2 transport infrastructure, namely the CO2TransPorts project for a pipeline to Rotterdam and the Northern Lights project for transport to Norway by ship. Since CCS is seen by the EU as an important lever to combat climate change these initiatives have been granted recognition as Projects of Common Interest (PCI).

Subsidy applications for detailed studies were submitted this week for both projects under the terms of the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF). A decision for grant award is expected in November. In addition subsidy applications are being prepared for the European Innovation Fund as part of the Green Deal.

Port of Antwerp CEO Jacques Vandermeiren declared: “This promising project will enable us to play our pioneering role even more effectively. It demonstrates once more that collaboration is key for generating a cluster effect and creating innovative, operational added value. If this shared infrastructure can actually be realised then it will benefit the entire industrial community in the port and make a valuable contribution towards the Flemish, Belgian and European climate goals.”

Wouter De Geest, chairman of the Antwerp@C consortium: “As the largest petrochemical cluster in Europe we are assuming our responsibility with unprecedented collaboration between eight leading companies. Together we are investigating the possibilities for cutting CO2 emissions from our production processes, as well as additional innovative solutions for more sustainable petrochemistry in Antwerp.”

Port alderman Annick De Ridder: “This project demonstrates our capabilities for technological progress are closely tied to the future of our climate. If we as the second-largest port in Europe can contribute towards saving up to half of our CO2 emissions, this will open up countless opportunities for sustainable growth in our industry and our prosperity. By taking on this pioneering role we aim to be an inspiration for the entire port community.”

Environment

Port joins Hunter group pursuing United Nations sustainability goals

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Port joins Hunter group pursuing United Nations sustainability goals. Image: Port of Newcastle
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Port of Newcastle is one of seven Hunter institutions that have united to advocate for and drive local adoption of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

Group members – PON, City of Newcastle, Compass Housing Services, Hunter Water, Kumalie, Port Waratah Coal Services and University of Newcastle – have committed to raise awareness and actively implement the SDGs in the region.

Port of Newcastle’s Environment, Planning and Sustainability Manager, Jackie Spiteri, said the move was part of efforts to become a more sustainable and responsible organisation.

“The UN’s 17 SDGs form the blueprint for a better and more sustainable future for all by addressing the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice,” Ms Spiteri said.

“We have joined other leading Hunter institutions to create a shared vision in this area, build our region’s capability and look at what that looks like in practice, including how that affects the supply chain, procurement and strategic direction of each party.”

Port of Newcastle last month released its 2019 Sustainability Report, which measures the organisation’s progress in achieving its sustainability commitments and its contribution towards the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the Hunter and regional New South Wales.

It is also moving to 100% renewable energy by 2021 and is continuing to transition all its vehicles to electric by 2023.

Ms Spiteri said a STEM scholarship program for Aboriginal students, currently being developed through a partnership with University of Newcastle, and programs to promote the empowerment of women in maritime, were just part of the Port’s broader commitment to sustainable and responsible operations.

“Minimising our environmental footprint, diversifying trade and creating a more resilient economy requires a determined, long-term effort, with co-operation between the Port and its stakeholders,” Ms Spiteri said.

“While we look to what the Port could be in the decades ahead, it is clear there are things we can do today to make the way we operate the port more sustainable and responsible.”

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Environment

Yang Ming fulfills green promise carbon emission reduced 51% in 2019

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Yang Ming fulfills green promise carbon emission reduced 51% in 2019. Image: Flickr/ JAXPORT
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To achieve the pursuit of global sustainability and respond to customers’ growing awareness about environmental issues, Yang Ming Marine Transport Corp. formulated plans to build an echo-friendly fleet a decade ago with the aim to proactively enhance ship energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emission.

In 2019, Yang Ming fleet’s average carbon intensity (CO2 emissions per transport work) per Teu/Km significantly reduced by 51% compared with the level in 2008, from 99.4 g/teu-km to 48.1 g/teu-km, accomplishing the IMO target of reducing carbon intensity by at least 40% by 2030, eleven years ahead of schedule. Through continuous fleet optimization, Yang Ming has fulfilled its promise of energy saving and emission reduction.

GHG emission plays a critical role in climate change mitigation. In this respect, IMO has adopted strict regulations to address the issue and set the goals to cut global shipping carbon intensity by at least 40% by 2030 and 70% by 2050 when compared to 2008.

To achieve the targets, Yang Ming has formulated several long-term strategies, including implementing 12 vessel modification and optimization projects, and accelerating the vessel renewal plan by eliminating vessels over 20 years of age and adding ten 2,800 TEU class, twenty 14,000 TEU and fourteen 11,000 TEU class echo-friendly smart vessels.

In addition, Yang Ming has cooperated with weather service provider Weathernews Inc. to build a monitoring system to manage fuel consumption and reduce GHG emission, and further evaluate the possibility of developing duel-fuel engine such as LNG or other engines that can perform with carbon-neutral alternative fuels.

As for sulphur oxide emission, Yang Ming ensured an early transition to use low sulfur fuel oil at Kaohsiung port and Shenzhen port in 2018. In the fourth quarter of 2019, Yang Ming’s fleet has switched to very-low sulphur fuel oil with sulphur content lower than 0.5% and reduced sulphur oxide emission by 80% compared to traditional heavy fuel oil.

Furthermore, Yang Ming has actively participated in vessel speed reduction programs initiated by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Taiwan International Ports Corporation, LTD to well protect the marine ecology.

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Environment

Samsung Heavy Industries and Bloom Energy advance plans for clean power ships with joint development agreement

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Bloom Energy and Samsung Heavy Industries, a part of Samsung Group, have signed a joint development agreement to design and develop fuel cell-powered ships. The two companies will work together to realize their vision of clean power for ships and a more sustainable marine shipping industry.

“By signing this joint development agreement, SHI has a plan to develop eco-friendly ships that will lead the future of the industry,” said Mr. Haeki Jang, vice president of shipbuilding & drilling sales engineering at SHI. “Our goal is to replace all existing main engines and generator engines with these highly efficient solid oxide fuel cells to align with the International Maritime Organization’s 2030 and 2050 environmental targets.”

SHI is actively participating in all of the relevant activities during the joint development, from early studies to project completion, in order to build highly efficient fuel cell-powered ships. In alignment, Bloom Energy has created a dedicated, cross-functional team of engineers to adapt Bloom Energy’s Servers to the unique requirements of the marine environment.

SHI and Bloom Energy are actively working towards the next milestone in this development with a target to present the design to potential customers in 2022. Following commercialization, the two companies anticipate that the market for Bloom Energy Servers on SHI ships could grow to 300 megawatts annually.

This joint development work aligns with the International Maritime Organization’s mandate to meet emissions reduction targets by 2050. Because the fuel cells create electricity through an electrochemical reaction, without combusting the fuel, these ships would be able to improve air quality with a reduction of particulate emissions, including NOx and SOx, by more than 99 percent, and shrink carbon emissions.

“The marine shipping industry has the ability to make a substantial impact on emissions and air quality at ports and across our planet,” said KR Sridhar, founder, chairman and CEO of Bloom Energy. “We see a collaboration with one of the world’s largest shipbuilders, SHI, as a moment to make measurable strides in reducing emissions and extending our mission for clean, reliable energy to the seas.”

The joint development agreement between SHI and Bloom Energy follows an Approval in Principle for fuel cell-powered Aframax crude oil tankers from DNV GL, the internationally accredited marine shipping registrar and classification society, announced in September 2019. The next class of ship to be submitted for design approval is the LNG carrier.

 

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